INTELLIGENCE IN ACTION

Surescripts Joins Leading Health Plans, Care Providers and Vendors to Accelerate Healthcare Interoperability with the Da Vinci Project

September 06, 2018

Surescripts is the nation’s largest health information network, transmitting 13.7 billion transactions each year, including 4.8 million e-prescriptions daily. But the scale of our network alone isn’t what sets us apart. It’s the unprecedented ability to unite participants from across healthcare, including healthcare providers, pharmacies, health plans, PBMs and technology partners. We call it the Surescripts Network Alliance. Together, our purpose is to serve the nation with the single most trusted and capable health information network, built to increase patient safety, lower costs and ensure quality care. One way we do this is by convening, informing and advocating on the industry’s behalf to deliver actionable intelligence and advance the use of health information technology that benefits both patients and healthcare providers.

Our history, scale and experience give us early insight to emerging challenges, their potential impact and how to navigate them across markets. Consider the challenge of interoperability. For healthcare professionals, inadequate interoperability means less than ideal access to comprehensive patient data—a barrier to care coordination that can result in care gaps and duplications and overtreatment. All of this comes with a risk to patient safety and outcomes, as well as a massive cost to the U.S. healthcare system. Ultimately, interoperability is key to successfully transitioning to value-based care.

Today, we’re proud to be a founding member of the Da Vinci Project, working with more than 20 other healthcare leaders to take action to advance interoperability by establishing nationwide governance and implementation standards.

Surescripts Chief Information Officer Mark Gingrich explains:

“The Da Vinci Project is just one example of how we convene experts and workgroups from across the Surescripts Network Alliance, and partner with leading industry organizations and standards bodies to advance healthcare through research, analysis, education and advocacy. We started with electronic prescribing more than 17 years ago, but today our entire portfolio of solutions supports the interoperability goals of the nation that enable value-based care. There’s no question that a truly interoperable network, like the Surescripts Network Alliance, is required to provide actionable patient intelligence that leads to better healthcare decisions.” 

To learn more about our work to advance healthcare interoperability, read the Da Vinci Project news release and visit Intelligence in Action.

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